Upcoming Events

Mar 2017

Psychosocial support for war-affected children and challenges to mental health systems: A View from Ukraine

University Seminar
Speaker: Mike Wessells, PhD • Professor of Clinical Population and Family Health, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

WesselsMichael Wessells, PhD, is Professor at Columbia University in the Program on Forced Migration and Health. A long time psychosocial and child protection practitioner, he is former Co-Chair of the IASC Task Force on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings. Recently, he was co-focal point on mental health and psychosocial support for the revision of the Sphere humanitarian standards. He has conducted extensive research on the holistic impacts of war and political violence on children, and he is author of Child Soldiers: From violence to protection (Harvard University Press, 2006). Currently, he is lead researcher on inter-agency, multi-country action research on strengthening community-based child protection mechanisms by enabling effective linkages with national child protection systems. He regularly advises UN agencies, governments, and donors on issues of child protection and psychosocial support, including in communities and schools. Throughout Africa and Asia he helps to develop community-based, culturally grounded programs that assist people affected by armed conflict and natural disasters.

03/27/2017 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm 6th Floor Boardroom (Rm. 6601), NYSPI, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032

Journal Club: Implementation Science

T32 Seminar
Speakers: Mary Northridge, PhD, MPH and Sara Metcalf

Mary Evelyn Northridge, PhD, MPH is an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology & Health Promotion at the New York University College of Dentistry and an Associated Professor at the New York University College of Global Public Health. She also holds a part-time appointment as a Professor of Clinical Sociomedical Sciences (in Dental Medicine) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the College of Dental Medicine and an adjunct appointment as a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography, University at Buffalo. Professor Northridge currently serves as the inaugural Editor Emerita of the Journal of the Academy of Distinguished Educators and the inaugural Editor Emerita of the American Journal of Public Health. She has enduring interests in social and environmental determinants of health, including oral health, and a current focus in the utility of implementation science and systems science to promote health equity. She is currently funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research and the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research of the US National Institutes of Health on a collaborative R01 among researchers and practitioners at the University at Buffalo, Columbia University, and New York University (Lead PI: Northridge), as well as several local participatory projects related to systems science, implementation science, and oral public health. Professor Northridge earned a BA in chemistry with a specialty in biochemistry at the University of Virginia, an MPH in environmental health at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey/Rutgers University, and a PhD in epidemiology at Columbia University. Upon the completion of a post-doctoral fellowship in cancer epidemiology at the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute in Piscataway, NJ, Professor Northridge continued her academic career at the Harlem Health Promotion Center of Columbia University, where her research and practice projects addressed the elimination of social disparities in health through community-based participatory research for more than two decades. Professor Northridge is the author of over 200 scientific papers and the co-editor of two volumes.

 

Participants are asked to read the following two articles for discussion prior to the seminar:

Mary E. Northridge and Sara S. Metcalf, “Enhancing implementation science by applying best principles of systems science” (Health Research Policy & Systems, 2016)

Sara S. Metcalf & Mary E. Northridge, “Engaging in Systems Science to Promote Health Equity” (SAGE Research Methods Cases, 2017)

03/28/2017 8:30 am - 9:45 am 6th Floor Boardroom (Rm. 6601), NYSPI, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032

Course Meeting: Priorities in Global Mental Health

Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
Instructors: Kathleen Pike, PhD and Tahilia Rebello, PhD

Topic: Mental Health Across the Lifespan – Mental Health of Children and Adolescents and the Aging Population

This course is a collaborative, team-taught course that provides an overview of critical issues in mental health and mental illness worldwide. Around the globe, mental and neurological conditions are the leading cause of disability. These disorders know no political bounds, and the burden of mental disorders on low- and middle-income countries is especially great given the enormous gaps in public understanding and services for mental health. It is estimated that 76% – 85% of people with mental disorders in low- and middle-income countries receive no treatment for their disorders, and even in high-income countries 35%-50% of such individuals never receive care. Historically, the global health agenda has prioritized communicable and non-communicable diseases other than mental health; however, the data now unequivocally and overwhelmingly point to the essential need to make mental health an integral component of the global health agenda. In Priorities in Global Mental Health, through class readings, projects and discussions, students will have the opportunity to learn about essential current issues, discuss innovative collaborations, and critically examine strategic initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of mental illness around the globe.

This graduate-level course is open to matriculated Columbia University students. If you would like more information about attending a session as a guest, please contact the Global Mental Health Program at info@cugmhp.org.

03/29/2017 8:30 am - 11:20 am

Looking Inward to Create Sustainable Development

Lecture
Speaker: Jana Zindell, Chief Program Officer, Ubuntu Education Fund
Sponsored by the Social Intervention Group (SIG) and the Global Health and Mental Health Unit of SIG

Jana ZindellThis presentation will focus on the Ubuntu model and delve deep into the issue of intranpreneurship and the importance of empowering local leaders in order to truly create sustainable development models.

As Ubuntu Education Fund’s Chief Program Officer, Jana Zindell oversees the strategic development and implementation of the organization’s programs. She spearheaded the creation of the Ubuntu Model, a strategy rooted in four tenets: individualized cradle to career care, focus on the depth rather than the breadth of impact, sustained institutional investments, and commitment to community partnerships. Jana has since established her unique voice within the nonprofit sector’s global poverty debate as one of increasing significance.

In addition to her programmatic work, Jana created BUILD, an innovative staff empowerment initiative, in 2010; the initiative promotes sustainable leadership, organizational accountability, and increased efficiency. She also served as the Ubuntu Centre Project Manager, coordinating the design of the nonprofit’s 25,000 square foot headquarters in Port Elizabeth’s townships. The Centre has won awards from New York’s Museum of Modern Art and Architecture Magazine. Jana received her Bachelor of Arts in international relations from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and her Master of Arts in international development and public policy from Georgetown University.

 

03/31/2017 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm Room C05, Social Work Building, 1255 Amsterdam Ave., NYC

Apr 2017

Course Meeting: Priorities in Global Mental Health

Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
Instructors: Kathleen Pike, PhD and Tahilia Rebello, PhD

Topic: Models of Promotion and Prevention

This course is a collaborative, team-taught course that provides an overview of critical issues in mental health and mental illness worldwide. Around the globe, mental and neurological conditions are the leading cause of disability. These disorders know no political bounds, and the burden of mental disorders on low- and middle-income countries is especially great given the enormous gaps in public understanding and services for mental health. It is estimated that 76% – 85% of people with mental disorders in low- and middle-income countries receive no treatment for their disorders, and even in high-income countries 35%-50% of such individuals never receive care. Historically, the global health agenda has prioritized communicable and non-communicable diseases other than mental health; however, the data now unequivocally and overwhelmingly point to the essential need to make mental health an integral component of the global health agenda. In Priorities in Global Mental Health, through class readings, projects and discussions, students will have the opportunity to learn about essential current issues, discuss innovative collaborations, and critically examine strategic initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of mental illness around the globe.

This graduate-level course is open to matriculated Columbia University students. If you would like more information about attending a session as a guest, please contact the Global Mental Health Program at info@cugmhp.org.

04/05/2017 8:30 am - 11:20 am

Implications of Theories of Etiology and Implications for Stigma: Does the Medical Model Really Reduce Stigma for Mental Illness?

University Seminar
Speaker: Matt Lebowitz, PhD • Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Columbia University Center for Research on Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Psychiatric, Neurologic and Behavioral Genetics

LebowitzDr. Lebowitz’s research concerns the ways in which attitudes and beliefs are affected by cognitive processes such as categorization and causal attribution. In particular, he has applied this focus to better understand the consequences of people’s conceptual and causal beliefs about mental disorders and other health conditions. Given ongoing changes in the predominant conceptualizations of mental illness (i.e., trends that favor viewing mental disorders biomedical illnesses), he has been particularly interested in causal explanations and conceptual understandings of mental illness, and their relationship to stigmatization and to attitudes and beliefs about psychopathology among symptomatic individuals, clinicians, and members of the general public.

04/17/2017 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm 6th Floor Boardroom (Rm. 6601), NYSPI, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032

Course Meeting: Priorities in Global Mental Health

Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
Instructors: Kathleen Pike, PhD and Tahilia Rebello, PhD

Topic: Ethics & Policy Issues in Global Mental Health

This course is a collaborative, team-taught course that provides an overview of critical issues in mental health and mental illness worldwide. Around the globe, mental and neurological conditions are the leading cause of disability. These disorders know no political bounds, and the burden of mental disorders on low- and middle-income countries is especially great given the enormous gaps in public understanding and services for mental health. It is estimated that 76% – 85% of people with mental disorders in low- and middle-income countries receive no treatment for their disorders, and even in high-income countries 35%-50% of such individuals never receive care. Historically, the global health agenda has prioritized communicable and non-communicable diseases other than mental health; however, the data now unequivocally and overwhelmingly point to the essential need to make mental health an integral component of the global health agenda. In Priorities in Global Mental Health, through class readings, projects and discussions, students will have the opportunity to learn about essential current issues, discuss innovative collaborations, and critically examine strategic initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of mental illness around the globe.

This graduate-level course is open to matriculated Columbia University students. If you would like more information about attending a session as a guest, please contact the Global Mental Health Program at info@cugmhp.org.

04/19/2017 8:30 am - 11:20 am

Transferring Knowledge and Adequate Technologies: The Way to Combat Poverty and Make the World Safer

Conference

The Infopoverty World Conference, organized by the Observatory for Cultural and Audiovisual Communication in the Mediterranean and in the World (OCCAM), with the patronage of the European Parliament Information Office in Milan, seeks to find the best solutions for translating the vision of a truly global information society into reality, and to launch the concrete message that it is absolutely possible and it is a duty to eradicate poverty and make the world safer. The Conference represents, for its continuity, operational capability and strong interoperability with the UN system, a unique global forum gathering leading experts, academics, opinion leaders, managers, government officials, philanthropists.

Global Mental Health Program Scientific Co-Director Milton Wainberg will participate in the panel discussion: “Health for All: The Role of Telemedicine in Transferring Skills to Villages.”

More information here: Infopoverty World Conference

04/21/2017 10:00 am - 6:00 pm New York, UN Headquarters - Conference Room 12

May 2017

Dr. David Ndetei & Dr. Victoria Mutiso

University Seminar
Speakers: David Ndetei, MD, PhD • Professor of Psychiatry,University of Nairobi; Founding Director, Africa Mental Health Foundation
Victoria Mutiso, PhD • Director of Research, Administration and Finance, Africa Mental Health Foundation

NdeteiDr. David Ndetei is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Nairobi in Kenya, and the Founder and Director of the Africa Mental Health Foundation (AMHF), a non-governmental organization dedicated to research on mental and neurological health and substance use to generate evidence for policy and best practice in the provision of affordable, appropriate, available and accessible mental health services. The Foundation is a leading center of mental health research in East and Central Africa. Dr. Ndetei has been Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator of nearly all published clinical and community epidemiological studies on mental health in Kenya. He was Co-Investigator of one of the first multicenter studies in the world, which focused on the neuro-psychiatric aspects of HIV/AIDS. His pioneering research on the relationship between intravenous drug use and HIV/AIDS forms the basis of the Kenyan government’s current policy on intravenous drug users. He has worked extensively as an international mentor and collaborator to National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)/National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded researchers. He is also a member of peer review and advisory committees to the NIMH/NIH and Grand Challenges Canada. Dr. Ndetei has published extensively in leading peer-reviewed journals, co-authored and edited 5 books and compiled 21 monographs based on his work available for public access at the University of Nairobi library.

 

MutiboDr. Mutiso holds a PhD and Masters in Clinical Psychology from the University of Nairobi. She is in charge of research in addition to overseeing the overall administration of the Foundation. She has been the Principal Investigator for two projects run by the Foundation on innovative integration of mental health services in primary health care through task-shifting to include both formal and informal health care systems. She has a strong interest in mental health-related research and emerging trends. She also has a strong bias to child psychology, parent-child relationships and developmental issues. She is a co-author in a manual on psycho-trauma, has contributed book chapters and published several articles in peer-reviewed journals. She has been in charge of the various projects that AMHF has undertaken for the past 5 years.

05/17/2017 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm 6th Floor Boardroom (Rm. 6601), NYSPI, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032